The MATMOL software can be downloaded as three separate zip-files containing, (i) the Source Files, (ii) some Tutorial Examples and (iii) some Benchmark Examples. For each of these files, installation guidelines are available in pdf-format.

Please refer to this work using the references to the journal papers in the reference section of this website

New release

You can find here the new matmol release (2016)

Source Files

Here one can find the Matlab© codes (m-files) with numerical methods for solving Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) and Partial Differential Equations (PDEs).

The ODE-methods involve classic integration schemes (e.g, Euler, Heun, Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg, Rosenbrock, …) that can be used in addition to the standard Matlab© integrators. For solving PDEs, different approaches have been included: (i) classic Finite Differences Methods (including Static and Dynamic Gridding techniques), (ii) Finite Elements Method, (iii) some Spectral Methods (as Proper Orthogonal Decomposition and Laplacian Spectral Decomposition) as well as (iv) some nonlinear operator techniques (Flux or Slope Limiters).

matlab_logo Link to the m files

pdf-file-logo-icon Link to the PDF files

Tutorial Examples

Here one can find, among others, the Matlab© m-files for the examples used in [2].

These examples simulate the Burger's equation and a tubular reactor with three different phases. Note that in order to be able to test these examples the Source Files have to be installed!

matlab_logo Link to the m files

pdf-file-logo-icon Link to the PDF file

Benchmark Examples

Here one can find, among others, the Matlab© m-files for the benchmark examples used in [1].

The examples involve the Buckley-Leverett equations for an oil well, a dispersive jacketed tubular reactor and a fixed bed bioreactor.

The methods employed are based on (i) a Method Of Lines approach [2] and (ii) an Operator Splitting approach [3].

The different methods are implemented for the three examples as Matlab© functions, and each time several algorithmic options can easily be selected/modified by changing the function’s arguments.

Hence, these files can not only serve as templates for practitioners when coding their own application, but they will also allow them to flexibly experiment with different algorithms and settings. Note that in order to be able to test these examples the source files have to be installed!

matlab_logo Link to the m files

pdf-file-logo-icon Link to the PDF file

References

[1] F. Logist, P. Saucez, J.F. Van Impe, and A. Vande Wouwer 2009. Simulation of (bio)chemical processes with distributed parameters using Matlab. Accepted for publication in Chemical Engineering Journal doi:10.1016/j.cej.2009.08.017.

[2] A. Vande Wouwer, P. Saucez, and W.E. Schiesser 2004. Simulation of distributed parameter systems using a Matlab-based method of lines toolbox: Chemical engineering applications, Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research, 43, 3469-3477.

[3] S. Renou, M. Perrier, D. Dochain, and S. Gendron 2003. Solution of the convection-dispersion-reaction equation by a sequencing method. Computers and Chemical Engineering, 27, 615-629.